Chelsea Crawford, PEG Scholarship Recipient, Pursues Lifelong Dream of Being a Neonatal Nurse

Focus: Nursing


Crawford, Chelsea Photo editedBecoming a neonatal nurse has been a lifelong dream for Chelsea. She has always felt she was meant to work with children. An educational grant from the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors, provided by a donation from AlloSource, will help her work towards her career goal.

When she was six years old, Chelsea spilled hot tea and burned her legs. Though at times it was difficult for her to walk, her injury inspired her to work harder and become stronger.

 

I feel as though my injury has transformed me into a better person and taught me never to take anything for granted,” she said. “My scars remind me every day that it could have been much worse and everything happens for a reason.”

Chelsea has always been passionate about working with children. She coached a recreational basketball league for third and fourth grade girls, which provided the perfect avenue for her athletic abilities and her desire to work with children.

Chelsea also served as a camp counselor for kids aged five to twelve. She excelled at bringing out each child’s individual personality and strength.

In addition to her burn injury, Chelsea also suffered two ACL tears. She endured two separate surgeries a year apart to fix the damage caused by basketball injuries. After each surgery, she completed one year of physical therapy before she could get back in the game.

She faced her recovery from her ACL surgeries with the same tenacity her recovery from a burn required. Chelsea did not let her injuries stop her from playing the sport she loved, and she challenged herself to do better.

Calvin, Chelsea’s twin brother, is also attending college this year. She is honored to have received an educational grant from the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors because it will help her family with the cost of her education.

Chelsea is attending Dominican College in Orangeburg, New York to pursue her nursing career. She knows that becoming a nurse will require dedication, but she is prepared to work hard to make it happen.

My injury is something I will remember for the rest of my life, but it has taught me more than it has taken away,” said Chelsea. “I would never want anyone else to go through what I have been through, but if they did, I would hope it would benefit them in the end. When you can learn from a difficult situation it is a whole lot easier to deal with.”

Story contributed  with permission by AlloSource, one of the nation’s largest non-profit providers of skin, bone, and soft tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures and the world’s largest processor of cellular bone allografts.  AlloSource has pledged a 10-year gift to support Phoenix Society’s Phoenix Education Grant program for burn survivor students pursuing their post-secondary education.  AlloSource blog: http://www.allograftpossibilities.org

 

Transformation That Begins With a Phone Call

maureen and assistance dogWhen you call the Phoenix Society, you may notice something unique in this fast-paced world of automation–you receive a warm and personal “hello” from a member of the Phoenix Society staff.  And something truly special happens when a burn survivor, family member, health care professional, or fire service member calls in need of support.

 Our staff of 9 people greets thousands of calls each year.  Those calls are quickly connected to the most appropriate member of our program team who listens to the caller’s need and works through a course of action for each individual. Although this is just one of the many hats our program team wears in their work at Phoenix Society, it is treasured.  “These calls take me back to my days as a critical care nurse and allow me to connect personally with those we are here to serve” says Pam, Phoenix Society Program Director, who has been a registered nurse for 22 years.  “For so many, their phone call is their first connection to support and the beginning of a transformation.”

A Life-Changing Phone Call

Maureen’s first call to the Phoenix Society in December 2012 was one of those beginnings.  Maureen explained that she was burned at the age of 3 when hot oil was poured on the top of her head. However, the point she remembers really shaping her life was the first day of kindergarten in the 1950s. She arrived in class with a scarf tied over her head as she wore every day to cover her scars. It was when her teacher, unaware of her injuries, made her stand and remove her scarf that she froze in panic. Finally submitting to her teacher’s demand, she removed her scarf for the first time in public and remembers the gasps and comments that followed her as she ran down the hall to escape. Maureen, her family (including 6 siblings), and the community were unaware and unprepared to help her overcome the challenges she faced growing up with a burn injury.

“For so many, their phone call is their first connection to support and the beginning of a transformation”

For Maureen, this led to a life of isolation and constant struggle with confidence. The fear of people’s reactions kept her from taking off her wig or scarf and made it impossible to engage in daily life. She avoided experiences like getting a haircut, going swimming, or taking a walk on a windy day. It was easier to keep her scars hidden.

Fifty-seven years after her burn injury, in an effort to overcome her depression and connect with someone who could understand her feelings, she went to her local library to search the Internet for help. She searched “trauma,” then “burn trauma,” and that’s when a link to the Phoenix Society website appeared. She explored the online articles and resources with eagerness. One in particular helped “pull her out of her depression,” she recalls. “I read the Adults Burned as Children article and thought . . . ‘this is about me, I am not alone. . . these feelings are normal!’ I felt validated. A weight lifted and I called the Phoenix Society the next morning.”

Something Maureen said really struck Pam during that first conversation, “I want to participate in life instead of letting it pass me by, but I don’t know how,” she remarked. That call for help was the beginning of her transformation.

A Plan of Action

Over the next year Phoenix Society worked with physicians and social workers at the SOAR hospital closest to Maureen to further evaluate her physical scars, helped locate counseling in her local area and educate the center on the challenges of burn trauma, and walked Maureen through our online learning programs specific to empowering survivors with social skills. We also became her support system through regular emails and phone calls.

When Maureen first called, she had never met another burn survivor and “wanted to fix her burns.”  After walking through the process together, she knows there is no quick fix for a burn injury, but now has tools to help her live life. It has become a team effort over the last year as most of us have had the pleasure of speaking with Maureen and were all very excited to finally have the opportunity to meet her in person.  With the assistance of a Phoenix Society George Pessotti WBC Attendee Scholarship, she was able to attend the 2013 World Burn Congress in Providence, Rhode Island, and for the first time meet not only the staff with whom she had been communicating, but, most importantly, hundreds of burn survivors just like her.

For Pam, meeting Maureen at World Burn Congress was particularly rewarding.  “I know the courage it took for her to step out of her house and fly to Rhode Island.  It is so gratifying to see her blossom, make friends, attend sessions, and be empowered to live life,” she says.   Describing her experience at WBC, Maureen said, “I finally feel like I am human . . . accepted and loved.” maureen support

Looking back at the feelings of isolationshe had endured throughout her life, Maureen remarked, “I wish I knew about this 57 years ago.” She encouraged other survivors to reach out, saying, “The sooner you call Phoenix Society for help, the sooner healing beings.  But, it’s never too late!”

Our Goal for 2014

Every day we receive calls from
survivors like Maureen, but for every call we receive, the reality is there are thousands that have not yet connected to the resources and support they need to truly live life. In the U.S. alone, 450,000 people are treated for burn injuries each year.

The hands-on experiences of the Phoenix Society program team have made it clear that

“I finally feel like I am human… accepted and loved”

our primary need, as we move into 2014, is to reach the thousands who are still struggling alone and are unaware that the Phoenix Society is here to help them on their journey of healing. Second, we must have the staff and resources necessary to respond to the increasing number of calls we are receiving.

Your donations made Maureen’s transformation possible. Your continued support ensures we can reach survivors sooner in their recovery and be able to guide them to the support they need to overcome their struggles. What a difference you make!

Your donation supports Phoenix Society programs that provide burn survivors with the tools and resources they need to thrive again

Your donation supports Phoenix Society programs that provide burn survivors with the tools and resources they need to thrive again

Wrapping up our Skills and Moving On at UBelong

While today is the last day of UBelong programming, we know that the impacts for each of us will go on and on.  We wrapped up by reinforcing the skills from earlier in the workshop (our confidence through STEPS, Rehearse Your Responses tools, and bullying prevention tools).  Everyone got a chance to say out lout how important it is to be understood and  make new friends.

Our program closing ceremony included previewing the video we’ve been working hard at, as well as a ritual that reminds us all of how we are all important parts of the survivor community.  We may be leaving Providence tomorrow, but we will all take the lessons and support with us!

Phoenix Society’s Talent Show Participants Shine!

Last night’s Phoenix Society’s World Burn Congress Talent Show participants dazzled the audience with a show of amazing talent!  We would like to thank all the participants for their efforts and willingness to share their performances with their fellow attendees!  We would also like to thank the talent show emcees, Frank O’Donnell and Tom Stewart, for providing their talents as well.

 

WBC 2013 Volunteers – We Thank You!

Phoenix Society volunteers give with their hearts and offer the many hands needed to make World Burn Congress an inspiring and healing week for all in attendance. Many give countless hours on top of their busy work and home lives to quietly work behind the scenes and make it all happen. We honor and value their contributions and would like to extend our deepest thanks for all they do.

“Our fingerprints don’t fade from the lives we touch” – Tyler Hawkins

IMG_1343

Whether you are a volunteer that has given an hour or worked with us for years, rest assured that the lives you touch are many and the gifts you give are great. We welcome your continued involvement in this amazing community.

With Heartfelt Gratitude,

Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

UBelong Participants Learn that Bullying is Never OK

What a day at UBelong!  We experienced a large group lesson from bullying expert, Katy Pearson, complete with a skit and small group breakout sessions to reinforce this important content.

Today we learned the at bullying is never okay, and that both the target and the bystander in bullying situations can do something to change things.  Practicing these things helped us understand how to respond in a bullying situation.

Mentors from the Young Adult Workshop visited each small group to share their stories.  Hearing how they felt when they were the same age as UBelong participants helped to give perspective and inspiration.

Everyone was very excited to keep working on our video, expressing ourselves in even deeper levels.  Stay tuned for the exciting reveal of this video where participants tell everyone what they ” want you to know!”

Chris Gilyard Describes her Journey – “Walking Through Ashes”

Chris Gilyard, featured speaker at today’s World Burn Congress general session, uses the words “Walking Through the Ashes” to describe her burn injury experience and her journey through years of recovery.  Thirty five years ago, burned in an auto accident at the age of 17, she suffered 2nd and 3rd degree burns on 21% of her body, with her face having some of the deepest burns.ChrisBlogpic

Chris explained that, although the physical pain and recovery in the burn center was intense, the emotional healing from her injuries was equally devastating.  She described how, upon first seeing her reflection in the mirror, she thought ” I don’t look like a girl anymore…..who is ever going to love me?”

Upon being discharged from the security of the burn center, Chris explained, she had no support groups, websites, camps, school or social reentry, or social skills training available. They simply weren’t available at that time.  She experienced the humiliation and pain of pointing, laughing, inappropriate questions, and hurtful comments.  And although her family was loving and highly supportive, they did not have the skills or resources to handle the difficulties of going out in public and responding to the reactions of others.

Chris stated, ” I felt so alone”.

Chris compared the available resources and assistance she had during her journey, and what she wouldn’t have done to have the resources that are offered by the Phoenix Society today, such as SOAR, for a peer supporter who has “been there” like she had; for social reentry skills, such as the Phoenix Society’s “Beyond Surviving:Tools for Thriving”, to help with going out in public; and for a school reentry program such as Phoenix Society’s Journey Back, to help with the challenges of returning to school.  Although she didn’t have these tools, Chris did rely upon the support of family, friends and therapy on her journey to recovery.

She described the breadth of her journey, including a pivotal point where another family member experienced a severe burn injury, and how this motivated her to pay it forward by becoming a Burn Support Representative at Regions Hospital Burn Center, in St. Paul, Minnesota.  She stated she learned  “the journey is much easier to do with someone by your side.”

Today, Chris is married with 2 sons and works in private practice as a Licensed Marriage Family Therapist in Minnesota, offering caring and healing for those struggling with burn and other types of trauma.

Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors continues to be the central hub for resources for everyone affected by burn injury, offering peer support – SOAR (Survivors Offering Assistance in Recovery), online learning courses, online support chat services, the Journey Back resource for school reentry, and many other educational tools and resources so that burn survivors and their families can live productive and fulfilling lives.  No one has to travel the road of recovery alone.  More information is available for these resources at http://www.phoenix-society.org.